Category Archives: FUNdraising Good Times

The Power of Urgency

Creating a sense of urgency is critical to fundraising. Sometimes – as in disaster relief – the sense of urgency is “built in” to the cause. Other times you have to create it. Either way, urgency can increase impulse giving and action by those who have every intention to give but keep putting it off! Here are two truths about fundraising: nonprofits can put off the work of fund development and fundraising until they feel their back is against the wall. And donors and funders can decide to give, and then take forever to make an actual gift or grant. There are always “good” reasons why these realities play out, and it is important to understand these. It is even more important to spot these “stalls” and get things moving […]

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Is money the only measure of success?

“If all I’m measured on is money, this is not the job for me.” These are the words shared with us by a nonprofit professional with years of fundraising experience. But the organization he works for measures him on how much money he brings in, not on any of the other aspects of fund development and fundraising. What do you think? Is money the only measure of success? How do you measure fundraising success?  Here’s what we know and what we teach, based on our experience: fundraising is a team sport, it is a philanthropic activity, not sales. Yes, nonprofits depend on gifts, grants, donations, sponsorships, and fees. But funds raised – money in the door – is only one measure of fundraising success. Sustained fundraising depends on planning; planning […]

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Ida B. Wells and Nikole Hannah-Jones – our history and our future

We are at a unique moment in history where we can celebrate the power and accomplishments of two Black women journalists: Ida B. Wells and Nikole Hannah-Jones. The life and legacy of Wells lives on in the work and words of Hannah-Jones. Ida B. Wells was born into slavery in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. During Reconstruction, her father helped start Shaw University (now known as Rust College), a school for newly freed slaves, which Wells attended. Wells was an educator, a journalist, and one of the co-founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Through her investigative journalism she documented and spoke out against lynching – including the lynching of three of her friends in Memphis, TN. She documented the causes of lynchings, speaking truth to […]

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Are we measuring a culture change?

How do you know what your organization has accomplished? What qualitative or quantitative data shows the milestones you’ve met? Learn how to get the ball rolling within your organization with our “DEI at a Glance” survey.

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Add fundraising and stir…

Fundraising is a team effort! Every staff member within an organization has something to add to the fundraising campaign. Whether it be sharing stories, researching, or planning. Utilizing everyone’s individual strengths can lead to a collective win!

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It’s nice to be wanted – recruiting board members

Cultivating a team of board members for your nonprofit can be tricky. Some prioritize recruiting people of power and wealth, though there are other factors to consider. Are prospective members willing to give their time and energy? Are they aligned with the mission, vision, goals, and priorities of the organization?

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Flaws and all – making the case internally

How can a nonprofit’s needs be met if nobody is aware of them? When it comes to communicating the needs of your nonprofit, under-sharing can be just as detrimental as oversharing. Stakeholders cannot offer their resources or wisdom if there is no transparency when things get rocky.

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Benefits of a campaign advisory council

When creating a team of fundraisers on a campaign, nonprofit leaders overlook an advisory council. To some it may seem like extra work or more people to meet with. However, there are numerous benefits that can lead organizations to fundraising success.

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